RJ
Tumblr
Themes
»
mirkwoodse:

Older Ikki :)
Here’s something I’ve started months ago and never got around to finish it, and probably never will. So have some unfinished Ikki with a lot of effects to mask the shitty art xD One day maybe I’ll draw Meelo, idk.

mirkwoodse:

Older Ikki :)

Here’s something I’ve started months ago and never got around to finish it, and probably never will. So have some unfinished Ikki with a lot of effects to mask the shitty art xD One day maybe I’ll draw Meelo, idk.

Posted 8 hours ago | Reblog | Via | Source
276 Notes

Tags: #lok   #ikki  

Aaw dam:-(…..>:-/he better pray la siguanaba don’t get his arse, meh much awesome things a wait in the future anyway,hey Anna have you try to read some manga translated in Chinese or websites like buidu they may hold something interesting to read?

haha aww ty, i hope so. <3 most chinese manga scans i find actually come from taiwan so they’re printed in a different writing system that’s a lot more difficult for me to read, but the issue isn’t my literacy in any case—i can read and listen at a proficient level, but i suck at crafting my own sentences. which is obviously exactly why the essays are helpful but also why i hate them lol

  • moses: let my people go
  • pharoah: man what is WITH these sjws
Posted 11 hours ago | Reblog | Via | Source
16486 Notes

la-vaniteuse:

Korra sketches

Posted 13 hours ago | Reblog | Via | Source
457 Notes

Tags: #lok   #korra   #s t o p  

asolitaryrose replied to your post: I’VE BEEN LOOKING FORWARD TO HAVING TI…

ooooh this happened to me too. the exact same thing. WHY

i looked this up and it seems to be specifically a kh2 issue. i’ve never had this problem before with any other games not liking my non-sony larger memory card… why kh2….. i love u and deserve more than this

Posted 14 hours ago | Reblog

Tags: #asolitaryrose  

I’VE BEEN LOOKING FORWARD TO HAVING TIME TO PLAY KH2 ALL WEEK BUT IT WON’T SAVE ON MY MEMORY CARD BC IT’S NOT THE OFFICIAL SONY CARD APPARENTLY 

Posted 15 hours ago | Reblog
7 Notes

Tags: #anna does life  
insomniadiesdown:

bob cut korrasRead More

insomniadiesdown:

bob cut korras

Read More

Posted 15 hours ago | Reblog | Via
308 Notes

Tags: #lok   #korra  
sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn
These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.
It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
Men speak more, more often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classrooms, boardrooms, legislative bodies, expert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.
The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”
This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.
Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60′s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off
In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”
 Really, practice those ten words. 
“Stop interrupting me.” 
“I just said that.”
“No explanation needed.”
 
 

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn

These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.

  • It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
  • For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
  • This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
  • As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
  • Men speak moremore often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classroomsboardroomslegislative bodiesexpert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
  • Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
  • Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
  • Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
  • On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.

The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”

This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.

Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off

In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”

 Really, practice those ten words

“Stop interrupting me.” 

“I just said that.”

“No explanation needed.”

 

 

Posted 15 hours ago | Reblog | Via | Source
38526 Notes

Let the fire burn the ice

Where’s the love we once had

Is it all a lie?

Posted 15 hours ago | Reblog | Via | Source
3514 Notes

Tags: #lok   #koko  

image

nafennasidaur replied to your post: GRACELING FOLLOWERS: give me a scenari…

younger katsa trying to discover her grace!

She’s six years old when she begins to understand the lords and ladies who never look her in the eyes, the servants who turn away from her and flick the edges of their skirts out of their path even as they bow and greet Raffin when he walks beside her. Katsa catches the reflection of her eyes in the polished bronze of Randa’s fancy dinner plates and notes for the first time that it’s strange that her cousin actually looks at her when they play. He’s always teased her for her eyes, and as it’s Raffin, she’s never minded; but just as anyone else would, she begins to fall silent when he mentions them.

She’s seven when she follows the bakers around in the kitchen, noticing the colors of their eyes and the strength in their hands as they mold the bread. They look her in the eyes, like Raffin, and Katsa understands she’s one of them. She’ll be a baker, too, she decides. She admires the bread that gives and rises beneath their hands, shaped and molded until it emerges fresh and hot from the ovens. She asks to help throw the flour, to push the dough and flatten it with her own soft hands, until Randa catches her with a smudge of white on her cheek and the sleeves of her dress and tells her no lady should have her hands in the kitchens and her dress pushed back to work.

She’s eight years old when a lord of the Middluns puts his hand on her thigh and she pushes the bones of his nose back into his brain. There’s silence in the halls, a deafening pressure against the ringing in her ears despite the amount of space no one seems willing to cross to approach her. She can only stare—at the twisted sight of her distant cousin’s face, at the blood on the collar of his tunic and worse across her own. This is a new kind of understanding. Her hands have shaped and molded, what Randa has told her not to do. Her dress is ruined now, far worse than it was the day he forbid her from the kitchens, and surely he will not want this to happen, either; this is the only thought, repeated dully in Katsa’s mind. But the king is the first one to stand, tall from his position at the center of the great hall dais, and say through the heavy silence against her ears: “I believe my niece has found her Grace.”

"I decided when I left Tokyo. I will see this through the end."

Posted 16 hours ago | Reblog | Via | Source
398 Notes

Tags: #rurouni kenshin  
Posted 16 hours ago | Reblog | Via
4 Notes

Tags: #gemma arterton   #beautiful people   #how i picture katsa tho   #!!!  
  • percy: you wanna go??
  • ares: im a god you absolute walnut
  • percy: i’ll kick anyone’s ass. i’ll kick your ass. i’ll kick your dog’s ass. i’ll kick my own ass
Posted 16 hours ago | Reblog | Via | Source
3199 Notes

Tags: #pjo   #bless  

non-cishet ships are great but also not exempt from critical analysis simply bc they’re not cishet